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Napoleon’s legacy, as dissected by Adam Tooze, is a testament to the power of historical forces in shaping our present. The strategic and political acumen of Bonaparte, as narrated in ‘Chartbook 251,’ mirrors the complexities of leadership and influence that continue to resonate in today’s geopolitical landscape. Tooze’s article not only revisits the grandeur of Napoleonic campaigns but also challenges us to reflect on the narratives that define progress and authority. A truly enlightening read that bridges the past with contemporary discourse.

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Having sat through this $200,000,000 stinkaroo, I have to agree with Adam and the entire French nation. What a pile of merde!

I can almost live with rampant ahistorical plots, but the payoff has to be entertaining. This film isn’t.

The economics of the era are usually absent from histories as they concentrate on the wars and Napoleon’s massive ego. I appreciated Adam’s insight as always.

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Fascinating!! Thank you so much.

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Despite the glory achieved in his successes at Austerlitz/Jena/The Italian Campaign, Napoleon often remarked that the happiest days of his reign were the friendly negotiations with Tzar Alexander at Tilsit, after the battle of Friedland. "I found myself victorious, dictating laws, having emperors and kings to court me."

I guess the real Austerlitz was the Tilsets we had along the way.

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You have saved me the trouble and money of going to see the film, Adam! Your historical analysis and recounting of what was is far more entertaining and thought provoking. What is apparent is the long lasting effects of Napoleon through legal systems, thinking on wars (Clausewitz), and setting the stage for European conflict, cooperation, and economic/cultural alliances to this day.

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Napoleon was a man who rose from the wreckage because someone had to...

... I don’t even know if the man could have made peace.

Like Germany, Great Britain couldn’t allow such a rival.

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Thank you.

Napoleon deserves better than that thing I won’t watch.

As does the age.

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Fascinating historical background, thank you!

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I really enjoyed your podcast on Napoleon, and the confirmation that this was a dreadful film. You might have missed after leaving after the Austerlitz scene that there was one French accent in the film: Tsar Alexander of Russia. He is portrayed as a petty French dandy, not as the ruler who marched to Paris to defeat Napoleon's continental empire, as described in Dominic Lieven's Russia against Napoleon.

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